Worcestershire
| home | map | google maps | tidal roads | 5* fords | overseas | RIP! |
| fording tips! | insurance advice | maintenance | finance tips | check the weather |




Brockamin
SO772527 (2*) Off-Roaders Only!
Sent in by John Brown (27/07/2002)

'Gravel-bottomed ford, still maintained for farm traffic, on public byway from Brockamin to Smith End Green. The farmer has recently improved the mud-surfaced hill down to the ford from the N side. The lane shows evidence of use by occasional 4x4/tractor traffic, but would not be motorable by an ordinary car (maybe a Trojan, but I wasn't in mine). The road was deleted from the OS 1:50k some years ago, but does still exist (and is still a public RoW). There is a footbridge a few yards away to the east.' image mouseover sent in by Stephen Manship (22/04/2004)





Broughton Green
SO962604 (3*) Suitable for All
(10/08/2001)

A simple ford in typical fording territory. The crossing is quick and shallow and is an ideal starter for some of the deeper crossings in this area.





Castlemorton Common
SO780394 (1*) Off-Roaders Only!
Sent in by John Walton (07/02/2014)

'This ford is found along a gated road called Hancock Lane at Castlemorton.'





Hollowfields
SO974600 (3*) Suitable for All
(10/08/2001)

This really is a cracking ford in a lovely setting. Although the crossing is quick, this is quite a major splash-down, particularly from the southern approach where a steep drop or kerb is encountered.





Kempsey
SO849490 (3*) Suitable for All
Sent in by John Brown (17/07/2002)

'An excellent example in every sense: a proper ford (concrete bottom) in a lovely village setting.'

http://www.geograph.org.uk

















Offenham
SP065471 (5*) Restricted Access
(05/07/2003)

Summary by John Brown:
'Close to the Fish and Anchor inn, this monster ford crosses Shakespeare's Avon across the top of a weir. Across the ford you can discern an angler standing shin-deep in about a foot of water; I would guess that, just after one of the sunniest Junes on record, this is about as low as it gets short of full-bore drought. A local told me that farm vehicles do use it, but I did not have my 4x4 with me, so did not attempt a crossing, and would have some trepidation about doing so given the force of the current here. An ordinary car, taking the full pressure on its flank, would have no chance.

The only undisputed right of way through the ford is a public footpath (for those ramblers bold and well equipped enough to tackle it). On the north side, a padlock and chain blocks the way to vehicles (Image 3) and a notice erected by the Upper Avon Navigation Trust (Image 4) proclaims that the way beyond is purely a public footpath. Worcestershire County Council confirm that this is their official position at the moment, but they are currently looking at the strong body of evidence that this was a public road in days gone by (and thus may still be). This includes the facts that it was shown as a yellow road on the 1946 edition of the OS one-inch map (Image 5) and a metalled road on the 1919 edition (Image 6); that the road to the river from Harvington is still called Anchor Lane, suggesting that it was the lane to this crossing and the pub beyond; and that the crossing itself is still shown on highway signposts as the Fish and Anchor Crossing. The first edition of the OS one-inch map, published 1831, shows a ferry here (Image 7); the pub is already named as the Fish and Anchor. The north bank is accessible by car, and used by anglers, although not open to other users. Meanwhile, the pub licensee is planning to erect a footbridge across the river to give access to the pub for fishermen and for boaters tying up at the moorings in the navigation lock channel beyond the river.'

Info from Matthew Evans
I have fished at this ford on numerous occassions and not only have I walked it my self (very nice smooth concrete walkway, bit slippery under foot. Definately waders or barefoot, too deep for wellies! - usually 12-18" deep) I have also over the years seen a number of vehicles use it. Usually 4x4s or tractors, I did however see, in one drought year, a mini full of teenagers go across! Vehicles crossing need to bare in mind that when crossing the river there is a very steep-sided bridge over the lock cut, where you can if not careful, ground the front or rear of your vehicle.'

"Maybe irrelevant,but the square holes on the edge of the weir at Offenham are the remains of WW2 river defences built by the home guard for a gun platform." Adrian Wilkes

'Another piece of information that you may be interested in regarding Offenham ford at the Fish and Anchor and whether it was ever a right of way for vehicles, is a comment by Edmund New in his book of Evesham published in 1904. He describes it "a new ford calculated rather for the convenience of vehicles than of boating parties" (in the section titled "The River") I doubt we'll ever get public vehicular access across it again, but it does seem pretty clear that it was intended for vehicles when constructed!' Mark Goodge





Peopleton
SO935512 (3*) Off-Roaders Only!
Sent in by John Brown (17/07/2002)

'Commonly known as Barrel Bridge Ford, Peopleton is on a rough but hard-bottomed public road, motorable in a car with care, between Peopleton and White Ladies Aston. The ford is about 30yds across and 9" deep, with gravel bottom.'









Pinvin
SO947480 (3*) Suitable for All
(10/08/2001)

There is no competition...this is definitely the longest and deepest (light-vehicle motorable) ford in Worcesterhire. A concrete base of around 4 car lengths makes this one well worth a visit. Floods very easily as shown in Image 2 sent in by Darren Sandle (05/12/2006). and Image 3 sent in by Jon Davy (31/12/2006).





Ribbesford
SO775720 (2*) Suitable for All
Sent in by Steve Mason (13/08/2009)

'Brand New Signs and Depth Gauges. It's a bit sneaky as the Stream's 1ft deep on one side, then cuts through 3 channels under the road surface to drop a further 1ft-2ft down a waterfall! About 1 car length in width, you'd be pushed to get 2 cars across at once! Might be a bit nasty in extreme weather as I can't see the channels coping with a decent amount of water!'





Sea Ford
SO959513 (3*) Suitable for All
(10/08/2001)

Upstream from Pershore is the village of Naunton Beauchamp where this ford can be found. The ford is quite deep and lasts for around three car lengths, but is quite slippy; take care not to wheel-spin into one of the boundary walls as you negotiate the slight bend in the road! Sea Ford also has its own car park and picnic area, but best of all it crosses Piddle Brook! Image mouseover sent in by Colin Foster (04/01/2004)





Shell Ford
SO951596 (3*) Suitable for All
(10/08/2001)

This is the final of the 'Worcesterhire Three' (Broughton, Hollowfields and Shell) and is definitely the longest splash-down of them all. The straightness of the road means that this one can be hit at speed, but care must be taken as a small number of wildfowl are usually present. By the ford there is a car park and a small picnic area as well as an interesting two arch footbridge. Image mouseover sent in by Ross Dingley (06/03/2007)

Account sent in by David Goode:
'The wire across the lower side of the ford was installed after a car got washed off the ford in flood, which it does regularly. The occupants were a rather elderly couple and whilst they were not in danger were stranded in their car for some time. The gentleman driving the car in question is a member of the County Council!'





Upper Bentley
SP004660 (2*) Restricted Access
(23/06/2002)

"The one that nearly got away." This ford is literally a couple of miles away from my home and I did not know anything about it. That is until a friend cycled the national cycle route right through it. Upper Bentley is a shallow ford, but has quite a rugged bottom and so I wouldn't recommend the splashdown for anyone without 4x4.





White Ladies Aston
SO933532 (3*) Off-Roaders Only!
Sent in by John Brown (17/07/2002)

'Edward's Lane Ford is on a very rough, muddy and rutted public byway from White Ladies Aston towards Cowsden, which was bumpily passable on a summers evening in my Trojan but might be a different proposition in winter. An ordinary modern car would have trouble, but a Land Rover would be fine. The ford itself is big: about 40yds across and 1 ft deep. The Trojan made it, but with some trepidation as the exhaust was under water most of the time and I was worried about hydraulicking.'









| Aberdeenshire | Angus | Argyll & Bute | Ayrshire | Bedfordshire | Berkshire |
| Buckinghamshire | Cambridgeshire | Carmarthenshire | Ceredigion | Cheshire |
| Conwy | Cornwall & Isles of Scilly | County Durham | Cumbria | Denbighshire |
| Derbyshire | Devon | Dorset | Dumfries & Galloway | East Riding | East Sussex |
| Essex | Fife & Clackmanannshire | Flintshire | Gloucestershire | Greater London |
| Greater Manchester | Gwynedd | Hampshire | Herefordshire | Hertfordshire |
| Highlands & Islands | Isle of Anglesey | Isle of Man | Isle of Wight | Kent |
| Lanarkshire | Lancashire | Leicestershire & Rutland | Lincolnshire |
| Lothian & Falkirk | Merseyside | Monmouthshire | Moray | Norfolk |
| Northamptonshire | Northumberland | North Yorkshire | Nottinghamshire |
| Oxfordshire | Pembrokeshire | Perth & Kinross | Powys | Scottish Borders |
| Shropshire | Somerset | South Yorkshire | Staffordshire |
| Stirling, Inverclyde, Dunbartonshire & Renfrewshire | Suffolk | Surrey |
| Swansea, Neath, Bridgend & Gower | Tyne & Wear | Warwickshire |
| Welsh Valleys | West Midlands | West Sussex | West Yorkshire | Wiltshire |
| Worcestershire | Wrexham | Northern Ireland | Republic of Ireland |


| home | map | google maps | top tips! | tidal roads | 5* fords | overseas | RIP! |





| About Us | Official Disclaimer | Privacy Policy |


Treat yourself at the wetroads bookshop